Category: fun

East Portland Community Center Indoor Pool

If you are looking for a way to cool off this weekend, try out the East Portland Community Pool. I went last night with my partner and kids — it was such a good time! I had imagined just a regular pool when we headed over, but it is so much more.

There is a silly shark slide that the kids love, plus a giant red slide for bigger kids and adults. (Way faster than I expected.) The little ones can go down on your lap, but make sure to hold them up at the end!

My favorite part was a section with giant jets that created a current and a whirlpool.

We did the two hour Open Play Swim and it was just $18 for all of us.

We loved the non-gender-specific family changing rooms.

Highly recommended!

(Photos are from the official web site.)

OSU Master Gardener badge

I’ve been part of the OSU Master Gardener program for well over a year. I really enjoy the wide variety of volunteer opportunities it connects me with.

Just today I received my official badge in the mail! This means that I’m no longer an intern, but have become a veteran. This represents 64 hours of class time, quite a bit of studying, and 57+ hours of community service.

I will volunteer 20+ hours a year and participate in 10 hours of classes a year to maintain my veteran status.

Don’t be shy to ask me about the program if you are interested! I recommend it!

pollinator garden

We put a small pollinator garden in at Blossomwood Farmstead this weekend!

Here’s the hill before, with our chosen perennials placed where we wanted to plant them. We wanted things that would be relatively self-sufficient and not need a lot of watering once established. We planted penstemon, pincushion flower, red hot poker, yarrow, breadseed poppy, cosmos, valerian, and lavender. There was already ceanothus, a yellow red hot poker, and rose cambion.

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Getting all the grass and weeds out was the most labor intensive part. It looked like a bit of a mess during the process.

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Here it is with all the sod gone, ready to be planted, before the mulch.

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Here it is all finished!

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It looks a bit sparse now, but there is room for everything to grow and fill in. Can’t wait to see it in a couple years. We have already seen quite a number of bumble bees, humming birds, two butterfly species, and some small native bees as well. It’s amazing how fast they all find new flowers.

Arbor Day Foundation

Are you looking to do some landscaping? Check out this amazing resource!

The Arbor Day Foundation is a 501(c)3 organization that is dedicated to helping people conserve trees. Their mission statement: Founded in 1972, the centennial of the first Arbor Day observance in the 19th century, the Foundation has grown to become the largest nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees, with over one million members, supporters, and valued partners.

I have a running list of trees that are great for pollinators, all of which I would like to eventually add to Blossomwood Farmstead. The Arbor Day Foundation had quite a few of them available for purchase — for such reasonable prices! Plus, with a $5 membership I was able to get their membership prices (a few dollars off each tree.) They also added a free Red Maple and two free forsynthias.

This is the list of trees I ordered: Northern Catalpa (2), Sourwood, Washington Hawthorne, Tulip Poplar, Little Leaf Linden, Witchhazel, Black Tupelo, Sugar Maple, and Western Redbud. My total? $76.61. I’m a fan!

I also wanted to point out this program they have to get 10 free trees! (With membership purchase of $10.)

Home Orchard Society Fruit Propagation Fair

The Home Orchard Society has an annual Propagation Fair at the Clackamas County Fairgrounds. For just $5 (members) or $7 (general) attendees are treated to an amazing collection of cuttings and scions!

I got there right after 10am and there was a line down the block. Entry went pretty quickly once the doors opened. The event was packed! Everywhere you looked people were crowding in to grab the cuttings they wanted. I saw some people with huge bundle-loads that had to have been a foot wide!

Next time I have to remember to bring labels and a permanent marker. Luckily someone nearby was kind enough to share his.

I gathered a small collection, then set them up to start this afternoon. Here’s to hoping they root!

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Some of the things I chose:

three varieties hardy kiwi, including red princess

three male hardy kiwis

grapes: concord, venus, reliance seedless, canadice seedless, Himrod seedless, bronx

cherries: lapin, ostheimer weischel, montmorency, sweetheart

persimmon: jiro, fuyu

plum: italian, mirabelle

fig: desert king, negrone

I’m so very excited to see what happens with these!

Gardening for Pollinators

I teach a class called Gardening for Pollinators. It includes information about honey bees, native bees, butterflies, habitat creation, best plants for forage, and emphasizes organic practices. Please let me know if you would like me to teach it for your organization.

This class relies on a Powerpoint presentation, so we will need to arrange a digital projector.

Please email me at larenleland (at) gmail (dot) com to schedule!

 

Here are some great resources that I’ve collected to share on the topic.

Great organizations and information:

Portland Urban Beekeepers

OSU Extension Master Gardener Metro Area

USDA Forest Service pollinator site

Pollinator Partnership

Xerces Society fact sheets

OSU Extension 12 Plants to entice pollinators to your garden

Wikipedia: list of plants pollinated by bees

Southern Oregon Beekeepers Basics of Pollination

PDF’s with valuable information (plant lists!) that you can print out or read on your computer:

Oregon State University attracting pollinators guide

OSU pamphlet on butterfly gardens

USDA Forest Service pamphlet on attracting pollinators with native plants

Xerces Society pamphlet on conserving bumble bees

Puget Sound Bees pamphlet on bee friendly plants

Seattle Urban Bee project pamphlet on pollinator plants

Pollination Partnership Pacific Northwest lowland selecting plants for pollinators

Sonoma County Beekeepers plant for bees

OSU pamphlet How to Reduce Bee Poisoning for Pesticides

App for your phone:

Bee Smart

Help track bumble bees:

Bumble Bee Watch project

Free milkweed seeds:

Live Monarch project

Documentaries:

Queen of the Sun

Vanishing of the Bees

More than Honey

A few of my favorite books:

A Buzz in the Meadow: The Natural History of a French Farm

A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees

Victory Gardens for Bees: A DIY Guide to Saving the Bees

100 Plants to Save the Bees: The Best Blooms to Nourish and Sustain Native Bees, Honey Bees, and Other Pollinators

Top Bar Beekeeping

The Hive: A Story of the Honey Bee and Us

Nectar and Pollen Plants of the Pacific Northwest

Honey Bee Biology and Beekeeping

Attracting Native Pollinators

Honeybee Democracy

Thank you for your interest in helping pollinators!

Blossomwood Farmstead

I’ve been quite busy with property management lately, the reason being…? My family bought a farm!

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It’s a beautiful 42 acre property in Yachats, Or. (That is between Florence and Newport on the coast.) It includes a small 1916 farmhouse, which was one of the original homesteads in the area. In addition, it has a 2004 guest house, barn, cabin, and wood shed. There are 1,400 feet of river frontage, a pond, a bog, 12 acres of pasture, and 30 acres of forest. The land backs onto the Siuslaw National Forest.

It’s about 7 miles in from the ocean and south-facing, so is perfect for gardening. It’s been keeping me busy with quite a number of projects! (More details to come.)

  1. Refinishing the upstairs floors.
  2. Fixing quite a bit of deferred maintenance.
  3. Figuring out all the systems.
  4. Getting to know the land.
  5. Furnishing both houses.
  6. Planting things!

My short-term goal is to set up both houses as Airbnb rentals. (Keep an eye out for when it is ready if you would like to visit!) Long term goals include creating a bee sanctuary and a permaculture garden.

I’ve learned so much already just in the first three months of being a steward to this land. I absolutely love it and feel very grateful! I can’t wait to get to know it better as the seasons progress.

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Exciting changes!

I’m so excited to tell you about exciting changes in my business!

Although my clients have always been gracious, there is no longer any need to squish into the back of a Mini. I bought a Chevy Volt, which has quite a roomy back seat. Even more fabulous, we will now be cruising on electricity! Yay for Earth-friendly comfort! The Volt can run for around 50 miles per charge on electricity. After the first 50 miles it switches to a gas hybrid engine, but I rarely hit that limit in my daily driving.

Another exciting feature is that the Volt has it’s own wi-fi hotspot! I bought a iPad Air 2 for clients to use when we are on the road. With this, we can stay connected with up to date information as we are house hunting. (This also means less need to print so many sheets of information about all the houses we look at. Everything will be available right at your fingertips electronically!)

But more than basic info, if you want to know what information PortlandMaps.com has about a property, we can look it up right away. Have a question about the neighborhood? Let’s find out. Did you want to listen to your favorite music as we drive around? We can easily load up your favorite Pandora station.

House-hunting just hit a new level!

 

 

 

Oregon Mushroom Show

I went by the Oregon Mushroom Show today. This is a yearly event organized by the Oregon Mycological Society. It was a great source of information for mushroom classification, propagation, and much more.

Did you know that you can dye fabric using mushrooms? Or use mycology inoculations as a way to remediate a brownscape? (Brownscapes are abandoned or underutilized sites, often associated with industry, that contain some degree of real or perceived contamination.)

I got to smell and touch some local mushroom varieties that had been found just today. It was great to see them first hand and get to ask questions of the volunteers, all of whom seemed quite well informed. Comparing edible mushrooms with lookalikes that are poisonous was quite instructive. They were also demonstrating how to do a spore print, which is an excellent technique for identification.

If you want to find out more information about mushrooms in the area, try joining the Facebook groups: Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest and Pacific Northwest Mushroom Identification and Information Forum.

Here are some images from the show today!

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